Ewelina Warner's blog

The Clarkson Slide Archive crowdfunding appeal

We are happy to announce that our crowdfunding appeal had raised over £11,000. The money will be used to employ a project assistant in Oxford next year to continue the work on the Clarkson Slide Archive Project. we would like to thank all of our donors for their extraordinary generosity and let you know that any further donations will always be welcomed!

Please watch this space for more updates.

Early sixteenth-century binding

This is the early sixteenth-century binding from the flooded stacks of the Biblioteca Nazionale in Florence that fired Chris Clarkson’s interest in the laced-case limp parchment binding as a conservation structure. The thickness of the goatskin parchment cover, the lacing of all the slips along both joints and a substantial sewing structure on double alum-tawed sewing supports with structural endbands created a structure that survived not only more than four centuries of use but also saturation with water followed by drying.

Nicholas Pickwoad

Prof. Nicholas Pickwoad on BBC World News

The interview can now be viewed here:

Following the identification by multi-spectral imaging of the texts of early medical treatises, apparently including one by Hippocrates, in the under-texts of palimpsests in the library of the monastery of Saint Catherine on Mount Sinai, Nicholas Pickwoad was interviewed by Matthew Amroliwala.

Fifteenth-century Germanic binding

Board-attachment lacing patterns from the early middle ages onwards are enormously varied, and carry within them the possibility of identifying national, local and even workshop provenances. Chris found this example, with its very distinctive lacing pattern, on a fifteenth-century Germanic binding on a manuscript copy of Jacopo de Voragine, Sermones de tempore with oak boards covered in pink-stained alum-tawed skin.

Progress report

At the end of this week, Marco Di Bella, who has been working on the project since the end of March returns to Palermo with his wife Ilya and their tiny son Lorenzo. Marco has been working on rehousing the slides after they have been scanned and inputting data into the database. We hope to open it online at the end of the summer and, with the help of current crowdfunding to continue the creation of the metadata with new project assistants until it is finished.

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